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EileenDreams

Card Creator & Photographer at EileenDreams
Eileen is making the world a kinder place one card at a time. She studies graphic design and languages of the web but mainly she practices making people feel better with old school snail mail cards that feature photos of this beautiful world and kind and inspiring messages.
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[it-rotate group=”11″]OK, I should be more specific. “Eating in Mexico” is much too broad a heading. This is more about delicious food around Puerto Vallarta and Rincon de Guayabitos that you don’t buy in a restaurant.

 I’ve been eating coconut like it’s going out of style. Once you open the coconut, you have to eat it right away or put it in the fridge. Drinking the coconut water then eating the flesh right away isn’t any problem. Fresh raw coconut is delicious but has a couple draw backs:

  • First – the local young lady who chops the husk off with the machete is much more skilled than me. I would probably starve to death or lose a limb if left on my own to survive.
  • Second – coconut rates high on the “good for weight gain” scale and is high in saturated fatty acid. I probably ate a whole day’s calorie requirements before breakfast this morning.

Papaya here is also delicious but I suspect it could be responsible for a nasty batch of hives I’m sporting right now.

A father and his young sons rang the bell this morning. They were selling whole pineapples and limes, and peeled and sliced cucumbers in baggies. The pineapples cost $1.00 each. So, a couple bags of cut and sliced watermelon, cucumbers, limes, and three pineapples cost 70 pesos or $5.88 Canadian.

Yesterday we ate a tray of fresh raw oysters on the beach. The plate had about 20 oysters. My Spanish is so bad that we thought we were getting 2 oysters. The boy selling the oysters thought we meant two trays. We ended up with a lot more oysters than we could eat and offered them around. They also came with an oyster shell full of salt and a bottle of hot sauce. Spanish lesson here: “caliente” only means hot in temperature. “Picante” means hot as in spicy. So when they say it is not caliente that just means you won’t burn your fingers, it doesn’t mean it will make you break into a sweat – that’s picante.

The carts on the beach have grilled fish and shrimp on sticks which smelled and looked delicious. Even more tantalizing were the steady stream of pastries that flowed by. It took all my willpower not to buy sprinkled chocolate covered doughnuts every time they passed by. I did have a pineapple pastry this morning for breakfast. I will walk down to the beach later to get a doughnut or two. I also ate a bag of fresh cucumber so I think that evens my diet out.